Annotate PDFs on the iPad with Adobe Reader

Screen Shot 2015-02-17 at 2.08.22 PMStudents in my school district have spent a lot of time with Close Reading, and they have been learning how to annotate passages as they read them to aid in comprehension. Along with this, many teachers are trying to become as paperless (or paperlite) as possible by distributing documents to students via the iPad. Close reading on the iPad has been a challenge thus far, but Adobe Reader can definitely help with that! There are other apps that allow students to annotate documents, but the best part about Adobe Reader is that it’s free!

How Does Adobe Reader Work?

First, students need to get the PDF they want to annotate into Adobe Reader. They can do this by either downloading the PDF, or by choosing the send button, and then “Open In.” The opening page will be a list of the documents that have been opened in Adobe Reader.Adobe_Reader_landingDocuments can be organized by tapping the edit button. You’ll be able to create folders, move documents into folders, re-name documents, and delete documents using the edit button.Adobe_reader_menuSelect a document, and it will open full-screen. Tap in the middle of the screen to bring up the menu in this part of the app. One of the best features in this menu is the search tool. Tap the tool and type in a word to search, and Adobe reader will highlight the word each time it appears. Just tap the arrows down at the bottom of the screen to advance to the next instance of the word.Adobe_reader_menu2Tap the annotation icon, and a menu will appear along the bottom of the page. This menu contains all the possible tools for annotation. When you choose a tool, look to the top of the screen to see what to do with it. Students can add “sticky” notes, highlights, strike-throughs, and typed text. They can also draw on the page and they can even add their signature using this app. To move on after drawing on the page, be sure to choose “Done” in the top right corner.adobe_reader_menu3If a student makes an annotation and wants to remove it, just tap the annotation. A short menu will appear above the annotation– Clear, Color, or When students are finished annotating, they can choose the “Open In” button again, and send it to many other apps they have available to them, including Google Drive.

Common Core Connection

As mentioned above, Adobe Reader allows students to easily annotate PDFs, which means they can use the iPad for Close Reading. This helps students with their understanding of complex text. Using Adobe Reader is also a way to have students read and annotate multiple sources on the same topic. If students don’t have access to Google Drive for collaboration with peers, they could use Adobe Reader instead. In this case, students could take advantage of the Camera to PDF feature on the home screen.

What Do You Think?

Have you used Adobe Reader in your classroom? How are your students using it?

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