Story Telling with Adobe Voice

Screen Shot 2014-08-25 at 2.06.00 PMAttending EdCamps is one of my favorite ways to learn about new apps and Web tools. In June, I attended EdCampOC in Santa Ana, and it was there that I learned about Adobe Voice. We were talking about all the wonderful video creation apps that are available for the iPad, and a fellow teacher mentioned Adobe Voice. Of course, I downloaded it immediately and started to play around with it. Adobe Voice is similar to Animoto in that students can upload photos and add music and text to their videos, but Adobe Voice has some great organizational features built in. Additionally, students record themselves telling their story, which allows them to create and “star” in a video without actually being on camera.

How Does Adobe Voice Work?

Adobe Voice allows students to create rich, attractive videos that follow a specific story line. The story line can be altered, but it provides structure— a story board, if you will— which can be necessary for some students to get started. Adobe Voice also prompts students with questions each time they create a new slide in the video. The app allows for students to access the camera roll so they can use images they’ve taken themselves, or they can use any of the plethora of icons included in the app.

Students will start on the Welcome Page and choose “Create New Story.”

Adobe_Voice_Welcome

Then students will provide a title or an idea to get started. At the bottom of the screen are some ideas that float by, and they are categorized by subject. Tapping on a new subject area changes the ideas the float across the screen.

Adobe_Voice_Ideas

Choosing “Next” takes them to the part of the app where they choose the structure. There are 8 pre-determined structures, or students can choose to “Make Up My Own.” Swiping to the left or right across the structures shows the other structures that are available. These are not the text structures that we have come to know as part of Common Core, such as Compare and Contrast or Problem-Solution. They simply provide a structure for students to help them organize their thoughts.

Adobe_Voice_Structure

Students are then able to choose an icon, add a photo, or write text for the slide. At the bottom of the slide, they will hold the record button to record their voice. They can listen back, and if they don’t like what they’ve said, they can re-record the slide.

Adobe_Voice_Adding_Content

At any time, students can change the layout of the slide.Adobe_Voice_Layout

They can also change the theme of the slideshow, and they can make changes to the background music.

Adobe_Voice_Themes

 

Adobe_Voice_Music

When students are all finished, they choose the Share button in the upper right hand corner of ever page. They will be presented with many options for sharing their video. This is the one problem I have with using Adobe Voice: it doesn’t save to the camera roll, and you can’t upload it to YouTube– and in all honesty, that is a huge drawback of using this app. The video goes to Adobe Creative Cloud, which means students will need to create an account, or the teacher will need to create a shared account. When the video is uploaded to Creative Cloud, it receives its own Webpage free from distracting advertisements. At the bottom of the page where the video can be seen, Adobe Creative Cloud provides an embed code so you can post the videos on your own website if you wish.  **UPDATE! 1/28/2015** Adobe Voice videos can now be saved to the Camera Roll!! 

Common Core Connection

Adobe Voice allows students to create, think critically about story lines, and communicate effectively. Students who are speaking for awhile on any particular slide are encouraged by the app to, “Keep it Short.” Students will therefore need to determine whether they can shorten what they want to say or add a new slide to accommodate the entire story.

The app can definitely be used spontaneously, but it’s best that students prepare what they are going to say ahead of time. As you could clearly hear in my example, I did not do that! When students have the chance to write out their text beforehand and rehearse what they are going to say, the recording will sound much smoother and students will be working toward a greater number of Common Core Standards.

Students can use Adobe Voice to create presentations that will support their understanding of many of the Common Core Standards, including:

 

Anchor Standards for Reading
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.R.1: Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.R.2: Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.R.8: Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.R.9: Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.
Anchor Standards for Writing
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.W.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.W.2: Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.W.3: Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details and well-structured event sequences.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.W.4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.W.5: Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.W.6: Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others.
Anchor Standards for Speaking and Listening
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.SL.4: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.SL.5: Make strategic use of digital media and visual displays of data to express information and enhance understanding of presentations.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.SL.6: Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and communicative tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
Anchor Standards for Language
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.L.1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

What Do You Think?

Have you used Adobe Voice in your classroom? What kinds of stories are your students telling?

 

 

Leave a Reply