Fun with @Ozobot Olympics in #lhcsd

FullSizeRenderThis summer I made it my mission to bring computer science to the students and teachers involved with our Summer Academy. The theme of the Summer Academy was the Olympics, and the district coaches compiled units for each grade level that included GLAD strategies, Thinking Maps, Project Based Learning, and technology. I wanted to include lessons using the Ozobots, and I knew it had to be connected to our summer curriculum. Enter, Ozobot Olympics.

The Idea and The Games

Coding Ozobot to Follow a Path

After attending a webinar hosted by Ozobot featuring Richard Born, I was inspired to find a way to create a race of some sort that would involve a code that would be loaded into multiple Ozobots. The Ozobots would then travel along paths that were similar but different enough to mean that one Ozobot would “win” the race by arriving at the end first. I chose to call it an Equestrian race. After observing the first Equestrian race, students would then create a similar code in order to have their Ozobots partake in a 50-meter “swim.”

Coding Ozobot in Free Movement

I also wanted to include some activities where students would program Ozobots in free-movement mode. The first activity I created was Ozobot Golf. In Ozobot Golf, students are given 4 different pages that have a hole in different locations on the page. Each page also includes a sand trap and a water hazard. The goal is for students to get Ozobot to the hole using the fewest code blocks possible and by avoiding the hazards. If Ozobot travels through either hazard or touches a hazard, students gain a point. If Ozobot lands in a hazard on its way to the hole, students gain 2 points. The player with the lowest number of points at the end of the 4 holes is the winner. Each hole has a par score indicated based on the number of code blocks it took me to get Ozobot into the hole.

The last activity I created was Ozobot Gymnastics. This activity begins with the viewing of a video of a 2012 Olympic floor routine performed by a gymnast from Russia. In the routine, she steps out of bounds twice, but still executes some incredible tumbling passes and some dance moves. During the lesson, the students and I discussed which of Ozobots codes would symbolize tumbling (movement blocks) and which would symbolize dancing (light effects). We talked about how the gymnasts do dance moves interspersed with tumbling blocks and how they lose points for stepping out of bounds. The students were then tasked with creating a 1-2 minute routine using a certain number of blocks with the ultimate goal of not touching the line or going over the line of the gymnastics floor that I provided for them. For extra fun, students could set their routines to free music from websites such as incompetech.com and jamendo.com.

The Lesson Progression

Due to time constraints and the number of students who already had experience using Ozobots, (not many!) the progression of lessons changed dramatically from when I first envisioned the Ozobot Olympics. I had wanted to visit each classroom 4-5 times, but it turned out that the most we could do was 3 one-hour classroom visits. In the first visit, students became acquainted with Ozobots and learned to program them using markers and paper. In the second lesson, students experimented with coding Ozobot using Ozoblockly.com. Half way through that lesson, we watched the video of the gymnastics routine and students began planning their routine for the gymnastics competition. In the third lesson, students were given 25 minutes or so to solidify and test the Ozobot gymnastics routine as well as identify some instrumental music on incompetech.com that they could use to accompany the routine. The last half-hour of the lesson was reserved for the elimination competition.

The Outcome

I was pleasantly surprised by how quickly all of the students learned to program Ozobot using Ozoblockly. For some students, the paper and marker coding was more challenging because the Ozobot wouldn’t always follow their codes. Sometimes students didn’t put the colors in the correct order, and that was slightly frustrating for them when Ozobot wouldn’t do what they had wanted it to do. However, when we moved to the iPads to use ozoblockly.com, they all did a phenomenal job. Students were completely engaged the entire time we were using the Ozobots. They persevered through learning how to calibrate the Ozobot, which is not such an easy task. They wrote and re-wrote programs for the gymnastics competition multiple times. For me, the biggest win is that the teachers were excited about using the Ozobots and they want to find ways to purchase a set for their own classrooms for the next school year.

Want to see the Ozobot Olympics in action? Check out my Snapchat Story video:

Tips for Non-Linear Presentations in Google Slides

Choose Your Own Adventure stories are a fun way to engage young readers.  Using Google Slides, students are able to author their own Choose Your Own Adventure stories using hyperlinked buttons for adventure choices so that they can publish and share their non-linear stories. Something frustrating for students is that when they put their slide show into presentation mode, clicking outside the hyperlinked buttons will make the presentation advance to the next slide, which is not necessarily where the reader wants to go. Using hyperlinked transparent rectangles solves this problem. Watch this brief video to find out how:

 

Awww, Breakout! with #BreakoutEDU

BreakoutEDU Creators James Sanders (@jamestsanders) and Mark Hammons (@mhammons) state that it’s time for something different in education.

I couldn’t agree more.

Throughout this school year, I have been facilitating BreakoutEDU sessions for teachers in my district in order to introduce them to the concept.  More recently, I’ve had the pleasure of helping teachers facilitate BreakoutEDU games for their own classes. Teachers and students alike find that BreakoutEDU is fun, challenging, and just plain awesome. The more BreakoutEDU sessions I lead, the more I hear from teachers that they and their students have become “obsessed” with playing and writing games. That’s what education should be— so engaging that it becomes an obsession.

How Does BreakoutEDU Work?

BreakoutEDU is similar to the concept of an escape room. Students are given clues and puzzles to solve in order to get codes to open locks that are either hidden around the room or locked to the BreakoutEDU box. Once a game is launched, the team works together to beat the clock, solve all the puzzles, and unlock all the locks. “Breaking Out” means that the team has solved the last puzzle, unlocked the last lock, and opened the box to find out what is inside. Puzzles all require students to think critically, communicate, collaborate, and be creative. In many games, the more divergent the thinking, the more likely it is that a puzzle will get solved.img_6165

Necessary materials can be purchased from the BreakoutEDU website or you can purchase locks and the boxes at your local hardware or department store. I purchased an official BreakoutEDU kit, but I have been visiting stores around town for the best prices on locks and other supplies I need to supplement the base kit.img_7142Joining the BreakoutEDU website gives you access to numerous games that have already been submitted and accepted to the store. There are games that are specifically written for adults, which are appropriate to play during staff development or at a conference in order to learn about BreakoutEDU. Most of the games on the website are for students. You must join the website in order to access full descriptions of the games because all games are password protected. You’ll be given the code once you join breakoutedu.com. There are many games that are still under review, and as a member of the community, you are able to play the game with your students and provide feedback about the game before it becomes part of the approved games list. You’ll also have access to a template that helps you organize your own ideas as you start to write your own games.

Breakout Snip

One of the best parts about BreakoutEDU is the Breakout community. Thousands of teachers are active on the BreakoutEDU Facebook page. Every day, community members post pictures of locks or puzzle boxes they’ve stumbled across, ideas for puzzles and clues, or URLs to websites that can be used to create puzzles. Teachers ask questions of the group about facilitation as well as share stories and best practices for facilitating games. James and Mark are both active in the Facebook group, which means that teachers who have been bitten by the bug have direct access to the creators of the product!

BreakoutEDU Homework is the latest addition to the BreakoutEDU community. Each week, a new “homework” question is posted on the website. Some require watching videos and looking for clues within the video to solve the problem presented in the video. Others are purely digital games that don’t require any physical locks. In a digital game, all of the combinations to the locks” are submitted using a Google Form with Data Validation enabled so that the answers must be correct in order to submit the form. If you haven’t already checked out BreakoutEDU Homework, I highly recommend it.

**Note: BreakoutEDU Homework ceased shortly after this post was published. Instead, BreakoutEDU Digital was launched. Digital games are those that require no hardware. Puzzles are all linked from a Google Site (usually) and the “locks” are submitted on a Google form that includes data validation on each question. Check them out!

Common Core Connection

Playing BreakoutEDU games naturally develop students’ abilities to use their contemporary skills of communication, collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity (as in, being able to solve problems in different ways). The true Common Core connection comes when teachers create their own games that fit the standards their students are working toward achieving. Teachers can strategically create clues and puzzles that challenge students to use their knowledge of a subject or concept when developing games. Games can be cross-curricular by involving clues centered around the same content area but that require students to use different sets of skills.

What Do You Think?

What have been your experiences with BreakoutEDU? Have you tried the homework? What do you think?Please share them here!

Hyperlinks! In Google Docs and Slides! In the iPad Apps!

Screen Shot 2016-02-29 at 7.22.47 PMI have so much love for Google Apps for Education, and I am extremely excited about the update I recently discovered for the iPad apps (as I’m sure you could tell from the title of this blog post). As I was working on a Slides presentation, I tapped on an image and found that the update I’ve been hoping would happen, has! Now you can add hyperlinks to your Slides and Docs from within the iPad apps! Text, images, and shapes can all be turned into hyperlinks with one tap.

How Does It Work?

Tap on the image or shape you want to be hyperlinked, or highlight the text you want to be a link. A list of task options will appear. “Insert Link” will be one of the options.IMG_2240

IMG_2239Tap Insert Link and you’ll be able to either type in the URL or copy and paste a URL from a website.IMG_2243You are also able to add a link by tapping the image or highlighting the text you want to be the link and then tapping the plus sign at the top right of the actions menu. IMG_2245In addition to linking to an outside website, you’re also able to link to another slide in the presentation.IMG_2242You can’t tell just by looking that an image has a link (hyperlinked text will turn blue and become underlined). If you tap on any image, you’ll be able to tell whether the image has a hyperlink because the menu options will change from “Insert Link” to “Open Link” and “Edit Link.”IMG_2244

Classroom Applications

Now that students can add hyperlinks to their Docs in the iPad apps, students using only iPads have more options when collaborating on documents. One option is to “hide” links in documents by highlighting the text to be the link and tapping “insert link.” Another is to participate in a great creative writing activity: Choose Your Own Adventure slides (more on this later). Students can link to their own content or to others’ content, and so can you (if you choose to work on your iPad).

What Do You Think?

How might this addition to the iPad apps in Google Docs help your students to be creative and collaborate? Let us know in the comments!

 

Create Digital Portfolios with @Seesaw

Screen Shot 2016-01-22 at 10.36.10 AMWhen I hear the word seesaw, I usually picture the playground equipment of my youth, also known as a teeter totter. Now that I’ve been using the Seesaw app for awhile, however, I get a new picture in my mind: students quickly and easily sharing work with their teachers and their parents using the Seesaw app. If you’ve been searching for ways for students to “take their work off the iPad” and get it to you, you will definitely want to read on!

How Does Seesaw Work?

Seesaw is a “student-driven digital portfolio.” It allows students (or the teacher) to upload digital work, take photos of analog work and upload to the student portfolio, or create work to be organized in the digital portfolio directly within the app itself. Students are able to take photos and videos, draw, make notes, record their voices, upload from the camera roll, or add links they have copied from the Web. Seesaw also has a blog feature that allows the teacher and the students to publish work to the class Seesaw blog. Additionally, parents can download the Seesaw Parent app to have access to their child’s work as long as you turn that feature on and provide the join code.

You’ll be prompted with a few introductory screens once you sign up for an account. After that, you’ll let the app know how your students will be accessing your class.Seesaw_accessIf your students are younger than 3rd grade or they do not have their own email addresses, you’ll want to choose “Use Class Code.” You will then receive an email that contains the class QR Code that students scan when they open the app.Seesaw_codeWhen students launch the app, they choose “I’m a student” and then scan the code. It couldn’t be easier. Bonus–the app provides quality directions on the screen; just be sure you read through everything!

Once students are in the app, they have a few options for adding work. They can take a photo, record a video, draw on the recordable whiteboard, write a note (which also includes the option to record their voices), upload a photo or video that already exists in the camera roll, or include a link.IMG_2006As the teacher, you can also access this screen from the class feed by tapping on the green plus sign in the upper right-hand corner of the Class Feed screen or by tapping your name on the left-hand side and choosing Add Item.

Once the student has finished uploading or creating, he or she will tap on the correct name (or names in the case of group work!) and add it to the portfolio(s). You will then get a notification that a student has added an artifact and you have the option to approve the work before it is posted to the class feed.

Students can also add the work to specific folders that you’ve created. Underneath the work you will see a folder icon. Tapping the folder allows you to create a folder or add the work to a folder that’s already been created. Work can be added to multiple folders. You can also create folders in advance by tapping the folder icon located above the class feed list of students. You’ll know which folders an artifact appears in because you’ll see the folders underneath the work once you’ve organized it.Seesaw_foldersSeesaw has some built-in social sharing features, as well. Students can like work and they can add typed or audio comments to classmates’ work. This is an option that you can turn off if you wish under the Manage Class section in the left-hand menu (tap your name to access the menu).Seesaw_overviewIn the overview image above, you can see that one of your viewing options is the Calendar View shows you each date and how many assignments were turned in on that day. Tape the date itself to see thumbnails of all the assignments.IMG_2035The newest feature of Seesaw is the class blog. Tap on the globe to create the blog. Once you’ve created it, you or your students can tap the globe underneath the work to publish the work to the class blog. IMG_2041Last, students are able to send work directly to Seesaw from other apps. All they need to do is tap the Send/Share button, and Seesaw should be one of the options to “Open In.” If not, tap on “more” and slide the button to on. Students will then be able to choose their name from the list or share the artifact with everyone. If the wrong class launches when they share from another app, they will have the option to change classes.IMG_2042

Common Core Connection

Seesaw has done an excellent job of providing Common Core connections for different grade levels spans. From the left-hand menu, tap the blue “Help & Teacher Resources” button. On the next page, tap on Activity Ideas for your grade level span. There you’ll find ideas for lessons you can teach as well as “Common Core Standards Related to Seesaw” under the General Resources and Materials section.Seesaw_resources

In addition to the Common Core standards identified by Seesaw, using this app also helps students develop their 4 Cs: creativity, critical thinking, collaboration, and communication skills. Using this app is a great way to capture student work and student thinking in an organized way, and it’s perfect for classrooms that only have one iPad or for classrooms that have 1:1 devices.

What Do You Think?

Are you using Seesaw with students? If so, please tell us how!

A New Year, A New #oneword

crossroads-997123_1920A little under a year ago, I wrote about my #oneword for 2015: Focus. I spent the year working on keeping my focus on the big picture in both my personal and professional world. Did I get distracted? Absolutely. Did I keep returning to the #oneword image I created to help me out? You bet. Do I want to keep focus as my word for 2016? Yes.

I wanted to keep the word that I chose last year because focus is what I need. I don’t have any kind of medical diagnosis, but I certainly do get distracted more often than not. I tend to get lost in minutiae and then completely forget about my purpose for doing whatever it was I was doing in the first place. And it was as I was thinking about this not-so-awesome part of myself that I realized my new word for 2016.

Purposeful

Even with all the focus in the world, if I’m not purposeful about what I do, what’s the point? I thought about the word systematic as well, but I think that purposeful encompasses working in a systematic way. I have so many projects that I’m working on; I must make it a point to be purposeful with these projects. Otherwise, I will continue to let things slide by accident. I must be purposeful with the words I use and the questions I ask as I work to help shift teachers’ thinking. I must ask myself, “Why?” (and have an answer!) when I propose something new or suggest a change. I must be purposeful.

I am confident that this word, purposeful, will help me in my goal to promote meaningful change in my school district and in the field of education.

Help me in my endeavor to be more purposeful and tell me: How are you purposeful in your work? What’s your oneword for 2016?

The 12 Days of #tosachat: Day 4

Screen Shot 2015-12-30 at 7.44.54 PMI participate in several Twitter chats, but there’s one chat I try as hard as possible to make each week, and that’s #tosachat. Over winter break, #tosachat took a departure from the regular weekly chat and held a 12-day “slow chat.” A slow chat is different from a regular Twitter chat because participants respond to one question per day (or per week) instead of 6-8 questions in one hour.

The founders of #tosachat put out a call for guest moderators for the the 12 days of #tosachat. All we had to do was sign up for a day and come up with a question to ask. The obvious choice of days for me to moderate was Christmas day. I figured I’d take one for the team so all of my Christmas-celebrating friends could enjoy the day with family and friends. My question was nice and simple:Screen Shot 2015-12-24 at 12.26.40 PM

I was surprised by how many of my #tosachat friends participated in the chat on Christmas day. I didn’t think I’d have anyone playing– I figured they’d all be busy and unplugged. Instead, I found out that many were spending the day with family and friends, and some had various celebrations that they’d be attending. A couple spent the day like I did– with a movie and Chinese food (Jewish tradition!) and Twitter (new tradition!). Some people got cool gifts and posted pictures. But most importantly, I realized that holidays don’t trump the need for the connected educator to stay in touch with those near and far. Many of us have #fomo (fear of missing out!) and that motivates us to continue to tweet and converse on Voxer, even over the holidays. But I think it goes deeper than that.

The addition of #tosachat into our lives has given us a tribe. A group of like-minded educators who understand one another because we are living very similar existences in which we are forging our professional paths as we go. Many of us are “lone wolves” in our school districts. Many of us are new to our positions, and some of us have been on assignment for multiple years. Regardless, we have created a learning community and have quickly become friends who can quote episodes of Friends. We can all count on our #tosachat Team Awesome colleagues whenever we want to learn something new, if we need advice, or when we want to celebrate. It’s not easy to unplug from a tribe such as this one.

If you are a Teacher on Special Assignment, please join #tosachat on Monday nights at 8pm PST if you have not already. You can join in the conversation even if you aren’t on assignment because everyone’s voice is valued by Team Awesome. Maybe #tosachat isn’t for you, but I urge you: Find your tribe. Find a group that works for you and jump in. Create and grow your PLN. You will not be sorry (and your students will thank you!).

Happy New Year!

Twitter Entry Points for Teachers

lhcsdchatI’m on a personal mission to get the teachers in my school district active on Twitter. Some teachers have taken the risk and jumped in with both feet, and others have needed a little more scaffolding. Below are three entry points I’ve used to help teachers feel more comfortable about using Twitter for professional growth and learning.

 

#eatandtweetedu

I travel to nine schools, and I like to eat lunch at the schools to build relationships with teachers and be available to talk about tech. I had the idea to try and get teachers on Twitter during lunch in a casual, non-threatening way, and not as a traditional PD presentation. Teachers and I sit at a table in the lounge and we are all on our devices. We learn all the basics of Twitter, such as following others, navigating the interface on whichever device is being used, and we learn about how to use hashtags. We tweet to #eatandtweetEDU, and I encourage you to try something similar and use the same hashtag. Let’s build a learning community through #eatandtweetEDU!

#20DayTwitterChallenge

This idea came from @tnalau with the City of St. Charles School District and it was brought to my attention by one of the administrators in the district. We thought it would be a great way to give teachers a daily focus for tweeting. I tied the challenge to earning a badge on our district badges website (lhcsdbadges.org), and it was great to see many teachers getting more involved on Twitter during the challenge. The challenge helped teachers participate actively on Twitter, and many have continued their learning beyond the challenge. We will be starting another challenge on January 11th. Join us! Screen Shot 2015-12-23 at 7.57.17 AM

#lhcsdchat

This is a district-wide chat that I started last year to help teachers feel more comfortable with Twitter chats. The fast-paced chats can be intimidating, and some teachers have been hesitant to join the conversation because they aren’t sure what to do. Our smaller chat has definitely been an entry point, and teachers who have gotten the hang of it are participating in global chats now, too.

 

What Do You Think?

What entry points have you used to get teachers sharing and participating on Twitter? Please share in the comments!

Sharing Student Work: From iPad to Google Drive to the World

DriveThe iPad is an excellent tool for students to use when creating content. They are able to make different types of presentations, annotate still images, and create dynamic videos using content from multiple apps. But how does a student share work once the it is completed? Let’s look at how a student can share work (not just turn work in to the teacher) using the camera roll, Google Drive, and QR codes.

Taking Work off the iPad

The first step in sharing work is to ensure that the work has been saved to the camera roll. Different apps have different ways of making this happen, but most of the time you are looking for the send/share button– a square with an arrow coming out the top). Tap that icon and there will be an option to Save to Camera Roll. Again, different apps have different ways of showing this. If you don’t see something that looks like this image, just keep looking for the Save option.IMG_1946Once the content is in the camera roll, open the Google Drive app. Look for the + sign. Depending on the version of Drive that you are using, it will either be in the top right corner or the bottom left corner. Tap the + icon and look for the option to Upload. Choose Photos and Videos.Drive_Add

Tap the location you want to choose from– either the entire Camera Roll or one of the albums you have created. Tap the small thumbnails of any image or video that you wish to upload. When you are finished selecting, tap the check mark in the upper right corner. Your images will begin uploading immediately.Drive_UploadNext, tap on the “hamburger” menu in the top left corner (3 stacked lines) and go to the Recent tab. The images or video that you just uploaded will be at the top.Drive_RecentStudents can share their images or videos with you by tapping on the 3-dot menu to the far right of the document name.  He or she will choose “Add People” and then type in your email address when prompted. Tapping on the pencil will allow students to change the permissions of the document. Students can add a message if desired and then tap the send arrow.

You will find the work students shared with you in your “Shared with Me” tab in Google Drive.

Now comes the fun part. In my district’s GAFE domain, all documents have the default sharing setting of, “Anyone in Your Domain With the Link Can View.” This means that anyone logged into their account on our domain can view the document. However, this setting needs to change if you want outside viewers to see the product. Whether you do this next part or you have your students do it, you’ll need to be on a computer to change the sharing settings within the document.

  1. Sign into your Drive. You can access this from the waffle menu at the top right of the Chrome browser or by typing in drive.google.com.
  2. Right-click on the document (video, image) you want to share.
  3. Choose Share.Drive_Share
  4. Click the down arrow next to where it says, “Can View.”Drive_Share_Down_Arrow
  5. Click More.Drive_More
  6. Select the radio button next to “Anyone with the link can view.”Drive_Anyone
  7. Save!

There is another way to share the link. It starts in the same way:

  1. Right-click the document you wish to share.
  2. Click “Get Link.”Drive_Get_Link
  3. Click “Sharing Settings.”Drive_Share_Settings
  4. Follow the same procedures as above.

Next Step: Make the QR Code!

Again, you’ll right-click the document (video, image) you wish to share. Choose “Get Link” (as pictured above). Copy the link– it’s already highlighted. Visit a QR Code creator website– I prefer  to use i-nigma.com. Go to Create Barcode. Drive_QRCopy and paste the code. You can give the QR code a title if you wish (it’s much easier to identify QR codes if you do this!) and then right click on the QR code image generated.Drive_QR2

What Do You Think?

How do you have students take their work off the iPad and share it with you?

Make Videos more Engaging with @EDpuzzle

Screen Shot 2015-11-12 at 2.31.37 PMUsing video in the classroom to help teach ideas is not a new concept. Teachers are now using videos found on the Web or creating videos for students to use as part of a flipped or blended classroom. For many students, learning through video is a relatively passive activity. They might take notes if they’ve been required to do so, but those notes may not capture the intended learning. How can teachers solve this problem? Enter: EDpuzzle, a web-based tool that allows you to embed voice-overs and questions into pre-made videos. Scroll to the bottom of this post to see an example.

How Does EdPuzzle Work?

After registering for an EDpuzzle account, you will be guided through creating your first EDpuzzle. You’ll be asked to choose a video from one of a variety of channels, including YouTube, LearnZillion, Vimeo, and more.

Screen Shot 2015-11-12 at 1.12.15 PM

You can search for a video just by clicking through and exploring what is available in the channels, or you can type some specific content into the search bar. Once you’ve found a video you want to use, click on the Use It button (to immediately begin editing the video) or Copy (to save it to your content). By clicking “Use It,” you will enter the editing area, and you will begin in the cropping section. This is where you can trim the beginning or ending of the video you are going to use. Some of the videos available are quite long and you may need to crop the beginning or the end. Of course, if you upload your own videos you most likely won’t need to crop the video. *Pro tip: record a few extra seconds on the end of your video so that your voice won’t get cut off at the end the way mine did!

EdPuzzle Toolbar

You can click on any of the icons at any time throughout the process to toggle between cropping, inserting questions, or inserting audio tracks.

Each time you click on a new icon, there will be help text to guide you along the way, and it will also offer you a short video to watch the process.

Screen Shot 2015-11-12 at 1.16.00 PMThe real key to using EdPuzzle is adding questions throughout the video to check for understanding and to see how students are thinking about the content. There are two types of questions you can add– open-ended questions and multiple choice questions. You can also add a comment. Adding a comment means that the video will pause and students will read your comment on the section. Then they get the opportunity to re-watch the previous part or continue to the next part of the video. Just click the Questions icon, play the video or drag the playhead to the point where you want to add the question, and click on the green question mark at the bottom of the screen.Screen Shot 2015-11-12 at 2.41.55 PMIn addition to being able to add in assessment to the video itself, you can prevent students from skipping through the video and only answering the questions if you choose to do so. In your teacher dashboard, after your students have registered for the class you will create when you “Finish” your video, you’ll be able to view student data to determine who watched the entire video and who skipped through parts.Screen Shot 2015-11-12 at 2.54.05 PM

If you use Google Classroom, you are still able to assign EDpuzzle videos by creating an assignment and including the link as part of your assignment in Classroom. Taking this route, however, means that data from answering the questions won’t be saved.Screen Shot 2015-11-12 at 2.56.14 PM

EDpuzzle offers a student iPad app for those classes that use iPads. Students are able to sign in using Google accounts, Edmodo accounts, or with an Edpuzzle account. Students do not need to have a valid email address to sign up. Once they’ve created their account they can enter your class code to access videos you’ve assigned the class.

If your school uses a Learning Management System such as Haiku Learning, you can embed your EDpuzzle videos directly into your class. When students go to watch the video, they can sign in and enter your class so that their progress is saved. If you use another Learning Management System you will probably have similar integration.

Common Core Connection

One of the great things about using a tool like EDpuzzle is that the videos you create or choose can help you to address standards, while the questions you ask can help you to quickly assess whether students are meeting the standard. You are able to customize the questions you ask your students, which means that you can also address questions of varying Depth of Knowledge levels. And, better yet– students are able to make their own EDpuzzle videos when you assign them a project to do! They locate a video based on a topic or upload a video they’ve made themselves, and then they have the same tools that teachers have to add comments and questions to a video. This will give students practice with asking purposeful questions about a text.

Here’s an example of an EDpuzzle I made to teach you how to use EDpuzzle.

What Do You Think?

Have you used EDpuzzle with students? Please share how you’ve used it. Links to videos would be awesome :).